Sean R. Lynch is a user on literati.org. You can follow them or interact with them if you have an account anywhere in the fediverse. If you don't, you can sign up here.

Sean R. Lynch @seanl@literati.org

Javascript, Clojure, neutral overall Show more

I have so many self-hosted services now that I need to set up an OAUTH infrastructure 😕

"Steal This Show" is not my favorite podcast. Jamie King is surprisingly authoritarian for someone who supports piracy, but I guess that's a European thing I don't quite get.

Anyway, I listen to the show because it covers a lot of interesting topics, and this show finally got me to become a patron so I could listen to the extra material about the alt right's potential use of decentralized media. I think most of you would probably find it interesting as well.

stealthisshow.com/s03e11/

As if I needed another reason to despise Slack. Using a user-agent whitelist is lazy, user-hostile, and toxic to the open web. social.literati.org/media/feJH

We should stop allowing the word "open" to be abused to mean "open to every vendor in the supply chain adding their own crapware". Android is only "open" in this sense; open to vendors and kind of open to developers, while not being open at all to users. Even if its security weren't crap to begin with, the need for users to wait for their vendor to fuck with every update would still mean users were fucked.

LineageOS is actually open.

unjust arrests, debt, uspol Show more

Facebook, Weibo, VK, Google & Microsoft know who you know, where you were yesterday and what you bought there. Oh, if that got leaked, they probably tell you - some day. A few years from now. Time for #selfhosting nextcloud.com/athome pic.twitter.com/tIZhRkinC7 #nextcloud

Unless required by law or professional ethics demand it:

Companies shouldn't need to know people's gender

Companies shouldn't need to know your ethnicity

Companies shouldn't need to know your legal name

Companies shouldn't need to know where you live as long as it isn't a country under some sanction

Companies shouldn't need "identity authentication" or proof of ID

Companies shouldn't need a picture of you

Unless required, there is no legitimate need for any of these things

None

semantic web / linked data braindump Show more

Finally froze my credit report at all three members of the US credit reporting cartel. Their security for applying freezes is just as bad as it is for everything else, so I can easily imagine people doing it to others as a prank or DoS. They mail you your PIN but if you didn't place it yourself you might accidentally throw the PIN away.

I suspect that if a significant fraction of Americans froze their credit reports like they should, things would change pretty fast.

The fact that I can easily configure SpamAssassin to have fewer false positives and false negatives than Gmail's spam filter despite the much larger amount of data available to Google tells you everything you need to know about Google.

Got what appeared to be a random invite to a Bitcoin film screening. I figured it was yet more cryptocurrency spam, but it turns out it's from archive.org. I wonder how much of their interest in cryptocurrencies has developed since they got a massive donation from an anonymous millionaire?

complaining about the US credit card system & laws Show more

I think the thing that prevented 2008 from becoming a complete disaster for the Western world was that the US was able to dramatically increase oil production. In other words, fracking saved us. I don't think fracking is a conspiracy but I think the extremely low scrutiny it's getting is intentional.

Imagine that on a much larger scale, affecting everything down to the cash in your pocket.

Now, as a thought experiment, imagine that this is really going on, and every central bank in the world has been using oil and gold prices as a signal that they haven't been printing too much money. Prices that aren't being allowed to rise.

The reason everything slowed down so much in 2008 is that people suddenly realized that values written down on paper (really, numbers in computers) were complete bullshit. They talk about "consumer confidence", but this was a more important kind of confidence: confidence that if you bought an instrument at a certain price today you could sell it at a similar price tomorrow. Call it investor confidence.

More importantly, though, it could be hiding a huge amount of "latent inflation", i.e. there could be a huge amount of money getting "soaked up" by fake gold and other commodities that don't actually exist, to say nothing of all the fake value in the stock market (which could be getting propped up if it tries to fall, which is also a story for another thread).

You might think of this as much needed control of greedy speculators, but it hides important price signals and risks catastrophic collapse. People use oil futures to hedge against supply shocks. If the oil isn't there, flights have to be canceled and airlines go bankrupt (because they're always on the verge of bankruptcy, which is a story for another thread).